Tag: Financial Planning

26 Jun 2018
financial planning for your earning child

Financial Planning for your earning child?

‘I hope my son doesn’t manage his money like I did when I was his age!’‘

Don’t think my daughter knows that there’s life beyond 20s too…she at least spends so and has saved maybe Rs 10,000 in the past four years that she’s been working.’

‘I’ve given up Sanjeev. My kids have categorically told me not to talk to them about saving anything from their salary. When they need any money, I’m their ATM…and mind you, they earn almost as much as me, with no responsibilities.’

While we’re not going to dwell on the parenting aspects of your life, we can definitely give you some idea of how your children should go about their financial lives and end up much better than where they seem to be headed now. Ease it in gently into your children and we’ve seen some good results come in even from ‘hopelessly-given-up’ parents!!

A few points before we go ahead with Financial Planning of our Earning Child:

  • If your children are working in the corporate, they’ll not get the fauji type life insurance, life-long medical cover, DSOPF and very importantly, the pension. Each and everyone of these will have to be carefully planned and meticulously executed.
  • If they are in the armed forces, they will have some benefits but other bigger financial requirements will have to be planned for by them, which most of us didn’t do in our time!
  • Long term thinking will be the key. If a Harley Davidson, Europe vacation or expensive guitar is being funded by dipping into the retirement corpus, the retirement will definitely not be a ‘golden period’ of life.

There are basically five things that your child in the corporate needs to take care of for life-long financial independence. For children in the armed forces, skip out Points 1 and 2 below. It is also very important that different financial baskets are made for all the important requirements and are not violated. Let’s look at them then:-

Life Insurance

Before even a single investment is done, protection umbrella over those who are financially dependent on your earning son or daughter is a must. Only and only Term Insurance Plan should be taken. A cover of about Rs 1 Crore should be the starting point, which will cost just about Rs 8000 per annum for a 40 years’ policy for a 25 year old male son, even lesser for a daughter. But it should be taken only if the person has anybody else financially dependent on him/her. Eg, if not yet married, no life insurance cover is required as yet.

Medical Insurance.

Another must for your son/daughter. Please remember that if the child’s monthly basic income is more than Rs 9000, the child is not dependent on you irrespective of age or marital status. A no-frills basic Medical Insurance cover of Rs 5 Lakh is adequate for most children. If the son/daughter is married, generally a Family Floater cover is more advantageous and Rs 10 Lakh of cover is adequate. Factor in the cover available from the employer too if a long term employment is visualised with the current employer.

Provident Fund.

PFs, including DSOPF, are meant for imparting financial security in one’s life against job loss or retirement. Most of the employers provide EPF (Employee Provident Fund – rate of interest 8.65% currently) where both, the employee and employer contribute. In any case, a PPF (Public Provident Fund – rate of interest 7.6% currently) account should be opened and kept alive by depositing the minimum Rs 500 per annum. When EPF is there, prefer EPF over PPF due to higher rate. When not, PPF can be progressed. Both have a ceiling of total Rs 1.5 Lakhs contribution per annum and double up as 80C tax saving avenue.

Retirement Corpus.

This is the biggest financial bugbear in the civilian world. Taking life time to be 85 years and working time to be 50-60 years of age, at least 25 years of good life needs to be lived after retirement. Considering their faster burn out, current generation is dreaming of retirement at even 40 years of age! Taking out last 10 years as sedentary years, at least 15 years of active life has to be lived without any income coming in. Two good options are there – National Pension Scheme (NPS) or Retirement Mutual Funds. Both have their positives and negatives. NPS has a some additional tax benefits, and annual recurring charges are very less. MFs have more flexibility, many more options and withdrawals are much easier. Totally avoid pension plans given by Insurance companies.

Investments.

This is what one saves for meeting life’s various financial goals, emergencies and for maintaining a good lifestyle. At a young age, equity or stock market investing is a must and no better avenue for that than Equity Mutual Funds (MF). Similarly, Debt MFs provide a better alternative for safe investments over bank FDs, RDs and the likes. Thus overall, the MF bouquet of Equity and Debt MFs can fulfil the entire investment needs for long as also short investing horizon in a better manner in terms of returns, tax-efficiency, flexibility of investment and withdrawal, and time period than any other investing avenue.

80C Tax Saving needs can be easily met by the investment combination of EPF/PPF/DSOPF and MFs.

In a nut shell:

  • Term Insurance for life insurance needs.
  • Medical Insurance if required.
  • DSOPF/EPF/PPF in that order of priority for PF requirements.
  • Saving for Retirement corpus is a probably the most critical of all investing, if will not have a pension.
  • Mutual Funds are the best vehicle for investments.

Do you need help in managing your child finances, or for your financial planning of your earning child write to us and we will help you for sure.

29 Jun 2017
Kitna Mileage deti hai- Financial Planning, humfauji.in

Kitna Mileage deti hai?

Sir, I’ve told him that he has a 80% Debt and 20% Equity portfolio where safety has been given more importance as this is his retirement corpus, but he insists that he won’t accept anything less than 15% annualized returns since the markets are now booming!” -I could make out my hapless young financial planner was at her wits end.

“Sanjeev, what is this yaar? My overall portfolio returns are 25% CAGR (Compounded Annualized Growth Rate) but this one stupid fund is stuck at 17% and my planner is just doing nothing about it!”, ranted one of our aggressive customer.

One of our bigger investor has moved almost 50% of his life’s savings to a well-known Portfolio Management Service (PMS) because his initial ‘test-drive’with their 100% equity portfolio produced great results in these rising markets.

We routinely get calls from prospective clients who ‘haggle’ with us on ‘returns’ – if they invest with us, will we surely get them 15-20-25% returns? If not, then why not? During such conversations, sometimes we feel as if we’re in the business of manufacturing returns rather than managing portfolios, helping meet customers’ future financial goals and keeping them away from harm’s way!

So, what am I trying to bring out here by these examples? ‘Safety’ and ‘Returns’ are two ends of the investment scale. The twain shall never meet!! Your own personal investment slider has to be placed on that scale in such a manner that it meets your risk comfort level, takes you solidly towards meeting your future requirements (‘financial goals’) comfortably and of course, takes care of the market conditions – now and in anticipated future. If you want more safety, you have to move away from returns expectations while desire for more returns will always compromise safety. This is a universal rule and never gets flouted.

The way we do not buy a car just because it gives high mileage disregarding all other factors, we do not need to only look at best returns all the time disregarding its suitability to us, risks taken by it and whether it enables us to get the money when we actually need it.

Most of us know this but we still keep hoping to hit upon that magic formula, that magic investment avenue, which will get us the ‘highest returns with highest safety’. Many unscrupulous elements, sensing this innate human desire, have made their fast bucks on it – the Hofflands, Sterling Tree Magnums, Ponzis and sms-stock-tipping schemes know this weakness and routinely surface to earn their millions and billions. We all hear and read about them, sympathize with the conned ones, bless ourselves that we’ve not fallen for such schemes and then go about looking for such quick returns schemes ourselves! Somewhere we assume that ‘high risk, high returns’ actually implies that if you take high returns, you get assured high returns!!

Herein comes a very basic question – What is the actual aim of investing? Is it to get highest possible returns at any cost and risk, Or is it to make our money grow so that we can meet our future requirements of life, give our children the best education, give our families a great standard of living, and have the money available in the right quantity when we need it? We can already sense you nodding to the latter. If that actually were so, why not make that as the start and end point of our investment process? Why not plan out how much we need for our future big-ticket expenses, what are the best investment avenues to accomplish each one of those ‘financial goals’, how to go about it so that we reach that end point without much risks and how to remain tax-efficient during the whole journey? Believe us, the investment journey will be more pleasurable, more sure-footed, and lead to far less sleepless nights if you change your focus from ‘Kitna Mileage Deti Hai’ to ‘Meeting my financial goals in life’.

And that’s where the concept of financial planning comes in – but then that’s a separate topic by itself, of which a large amount of knowledge is available on our Blog humfauji.in.

And for heaven’s sake, do not fall for those predictions of Sensex or stock levels – such predictions keep coming all the time and they sometimes even turn out to be true. But then, even a dead clock shows correct time twice a day!

For more information, feel free to reach us on, contactus@humfauji.in or call + 011 – 4240 2032, 40545977, 49036836 or

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26 Apr 2017
Are you helping your Earning Child manage the money Wisely

Are you helping your Earning Child manage the money Wisely?

There is no doubt that accumulation of substantial wealth generally occurs only over a sustained period of time. The best way to do it is the slow and steady manner in which your earning child needs to go the disciplined way and accumulate the drops that will make the mighty ocean. All this is, however, common knowledge – no points for guessing the same. But the point where the script differs is what financial instruments to save in? Believe it or not, it has been statistically proven time and again that it is not the timing of investments but the asset allocation – ie, what all do you invest in and in what proportion – which matters over a long period of time. Wrong choice of instruments will do irreparable damage to the wealth creation efforts while incorrect timings can easily be handled by regular investments in a disciplined manner over a long period of time to achieve rupee-cost averaging. Fixed interest instruments like bank / company FDs achieve this averaging by the method of ‘laddering’ where new FDs are bought every year and maturing older FDs are re-invested to create the ‘ladder’ effect. In case of equity instruments like the equity-diversified mutual funds, Systematic Investment Plans (SIPs) achieve the same effect of riding out the market fluctuations in the same manner as a flywheel rides out the engine torque variations in an automobile.

However, still the original question of correct asset allocation remains unanswered.

Generally it is seen that, at least in the initial earning years of an earning child, he/she is heavily dependent and influenced by his/her parents’ (generally father’s) pattern of investment. If the influencing parent is conservative and only goes in for safety of capital like in provident fund, bank FDs, insurance policies and NSCs, the child also thinks on similar lines. The fact that these fixed interest instruments are almost never able to keep up with the monster of inflation, and consequently provide negative inflation-adjusted real rates of return, is lost sight of. Thus, while the money may seem to be growing in these instruments in absolute terms, its purchasing power (or effective worth) is being lost at a rate equal to the difference between inflation and tax-adjusted returns of the investment instrument. To take an example – if a bank FD gives 9% rate of interest and the child is in 20% tax-bracket (ie earning between Rs 5 – 10 Lakhs a year), his/her actual returns on the FD are 9% minus 1.8% tax (20% of 9%), that is only 7.2% per year. With the consumer inflation stubbornly at around 9.5% today, the child’s money’s worth is being lost at the rate of 2.3% per year on a cumulative basis! The returns are likely to get further pruned in the current era of high-inflation and falling-interest-rates as this 2.3% gap widens. If the same money was to be invested in SIPs of equity-diversified mutual funds, the long-term returns of the same would be 12% per annum on a conservative basis while being fully tax-exempt as per the current tax laws. Adjusted against inflation, it is likely to give 3% positive cumulative yearly returns on a conservative basis. Of course, one has to keep faith in the long-term returns potential of equity while not getting unnerved by the short-term equity-typical fluctuations.

So finally, how should you, as a financially savvy parent, guide your earning child who has many years of savings potential with him/her? He/she should:-

  1. Save a small amount regularly in fixed-income instruments (like PPF or EPF) for safety and certainty of returns.
  2. Take a term insurance plan for getting a substantial amount of insurance (say, typically Rs 1 Crore or so) at a premium which will be meagre at his/her young age.
  3. Take a medical insurance preferably with life-time renewability, for an adequate amount unless he/she has the surety of employer-provided medical cover like in a Govt job.
  4. Go in for maximum amount of SIPs in equity-diversified mutual funds (MFs) on a monthly basis with long-term in mind. Investment in MFs should made through a carefully constructed balanced portfolio with regular monitoring rather than as stand-alone MFs bought just because they are individually performing the best today.
  5. At some point in future, typically 5-10 years after the child starts earning, you can tell him/her to go in for a house/flat using a home loan with EMIs on a regular step-up basis so that the loan repayment increases as the child’s income increases.

An investment pattern as above is likely to provide the child a substantial accumulation of wealth for future while still giving enough liquidity for any requirements in between.

And what should you tell him/her to avoid? Insurance as an investment vehicle; more than 20% of the regular savings potential into fixed income financial instruments; short-term trading in equity, commodities, futures & options etc unless the son/daughter really understands the same; and lastly, credit card debts which are not repayable in the very next payment cycle.

I am sure your son/daughter will be ever-grateful to you for this intelligent hand-holding and on your part, you would also not have to worry whether you guided him/her well on the financial front as well as you did on other aspects of life.


With regards,

Col (retd) Sanjeev Govila, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERCM

CEO, Hum Fauji InitiativesTM,
Your Long-term Partner for Wealth Creation
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